Christian Fellowship Easter Egg Hunt cracks open childhood memories

Patrick Brady / THE GATEPOST

Framingham State University’s Christian Fellowship hosted an Easter egg hunt April 13. The event began in the Heineman Ecumenical Center.

McKaela Davies, a senior business management major and president of Christian Fellowship, explained the event was divided into two parts. She described the first half as being a free-for-all egg hunt, but didn’t initially elaborate on what the second half would entail.

She said the event would be a fun way to bring the community together and make new friends. Even though her family didn’t do Easter egg hunts, she and her three sisters would “interweave” a giant “yarn mess.”

Emma Vogler, a sophomore early education major, said she was very excited to go Easter egg hunting because she “likes a challenge.” In addition, she works at a daycare in Natick.

“I work with kids, so they do this too at my work,” she added. “It brings me back to being a little kid.”

Nana-yaw Afiedzie, a junior psychology major, said he participated because he wanted to relive past childhood memories. When he was a kid, he and his grandmother dyed eggs on Easter.

“Different cousins and sometimes kids from the neighborhood would [decorate eggs],” he said. “It was a really fun experience in my life.”

Alex Szarka, a junior history major, said he looked forward to meeting new people, finding good candy, and being in the sunshine. “I can’t remember too many Easter memories to be honest.”

Lily Borst, a junior business major and treasurer of Christian Fellowship, said her fondest memory of Easter was finding eggs filled with jelly beans.

Kelsey Behrikis, a senior psychology major and marketing coordinator of Christian Fellowship, said she loved Easter egg hunting with her cousins when she was young, although they were very competitive with each other.

After a brief explanation of the rules, everyone made their way up to the campus green and began hunting for the 42 eggs that were scattered around the area. Once the eggs were all collected, Davies explained that everyone would be divided into two groups for the second activity.

Both groups were then given an egg with a clue inside. Each clue gave hints as to where the next egg was located.

Once all four eggs were found, everyone headed back to the Ecumenical Center. Upon entering, they were greeted with even more free candy.

Szarka said he really enjoyed the event because he got to connect with many people while collecting eggs. “This was my greatest Easter memory.”