Ferr or Foul The Price is Right for the Red Sox

On Sunday, Oct. 28, the Boston Red Sox clinched their fourth World Series title in the past 15 seasons.

Boston defeated the high-powered Los Angeles Dodgers in just five games to become World Series champions.

Steve Pearce, a mid-season acquisition for Boston, was crowned the World Series MVP. He batted .333 with three homers and eight RBIs in the five-game span.

While Pearce had a great World Series and deserved to win the MVP award, the best story of the World Series has to be David Price.

Price has historically been terrible in the postseason during his career.

In his 10 seasons prior to 2018, Price has been to the playoffs eight times, with just three wins in his nine starts – not to mention an ERA well over 4.00.

Going into the 2018 postseason, Price looked like the same old choke artist he’s been in the past.

He started Game 2 of the ALDS against the Yankees and took the loss, as he gave up three runs in just 1.2 innings.

But the Red Sox eventually took the series from the Yankees and advanced to the ALCS to take on the Astros.

Once again, Price started Game 2 for the Red Sox and failed to impress, as he gave up four runs in just 4.2 innings, an ERA of 7.71.

Right when Boston was ready to give up on him, star pitcher Chris Sale was hospitalized with a stomach illness, forcing Price to step in on short rest and start Game 5 with a chance to send the team to the World Series.

Many Red Sox fans were nervous with Price on the mound, but he turned in a masterful performance.

He pitched six innings, gave up only three hits, struck out nine, but most importantly, gave up zero runs and picked up the win to send Boston to the World Series.

With many saying Game 5 of the ALCS was just a fluke for Price, he took the mound again in Game 2 of the World Series against the Dodgers.

He showed it was no fluke.

Price again turned in an outstanding performance for Boston, as he went six strong innings, giving up three hits, two runs and striking out five. He picked up another win and allowed the Red Sox to take a key 2-0 series lead.

Then after a tough loss in 18 innings and another win, the Red Sox now held a 3-1 lead in the series.

The only thing that stood in their way was Clayton Kershaw, arguably the greatest left-handed pitcher in MLB history.

With many thinking Red Sox manager Alex Cora would turn to Sale for this game, he shocked everyone and went with Price on short rest.

And what a move it turned out to be.

In what was probably the biggest start of Price’s career, he turned in one of the best postseason performances of his life.

Besides the leadoff home run he surrendered, Price was absolutely lights out. He pitched seven innings, gave up just three hits, one run and struck out five, and sealed the win for the Red Sox to help them earn another World Series trophy.

If Pearce had not performed so well in the World Series, Price would have easily won the World Series MVP award.

After 10 years of playoff struggles, I think it is safe to say Price has finally defeated his inner demons and proved he can perform in the playoffs when it matters.

If Pearce had not performed so well in the World Series, Price would have easily won the World Series MVP award.

After 10 years of playoff struggles, I think it is safe to say Price has finally defeated his inner demons and proved he can perform in the playoffs, when it matters.

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